World Class Design Team

Banknote Currency Design Services

“We are trained to create banknotes that are engaging and appealing to the eye, but banknotes are much more than aesthetics and beautiful engraving. They have to be easily recognizable, create a sense of security for the user, be identifiable for a number of different machines and they should not lend themselves to counterfeiting”, says Karin Mörck-Hamilton, Head of Design Services at Crane Currency.

Karin Mörck-Hamilton and her colleague Gunnar Nehls, master engraver, are important players in Crane Currency’s design team. The team, a dozen strong and having its base at the venerable Crane AB outside Stockholm, work closely with their US and international colleagues.

Innovative graphic method

Many different steps have to be combined in order to make a bank note – from design concept, origination an integration of security features to papermaking and printing in different techniques. The note should have an appealing design while at the same time highlight the security features.

“Our product design has a high security level and the actual engraving is extremely hard to counterfeit or to transform into an original for printing. We have developed a graphic that we call Intaglio FusionTM which combines classic expression with modern digital expression patterns. With safety features such as micro-optics in the notes, we bring a 500-year old craftsmanship into the future”, says Gunnar Nehls.

Design partnerships

Central banks have also become more interested in banknote design and more aware and knowledgeable of security technologies, fueling an appreciation for working partners who can integrate these security aspects effectively. That translates into to a stronger partnership with the design process all the way through to the final production of the notes.

“This means that the cooperation is more rewarding and interesting. The technological development and security requirements have also had an impact on inspiration and today we have the opportunity to work with almost three-dimensional products”, says Gunnar Nehls.